Stop Herta’s Deportation

19 year-old Herta Lluso is going to be deported from the US on August 19. Unless, of course, we can get ICE officials to grant her a stay of deportation.

Herta’s case is a strong example of just why we need the Dream Act:

The Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act (The “DREAM Act”) is a piece of proposed federal legislation that was introduced in the US Senate, and the US House of Representatives on March 26, 2009. This bill would provide certain illegal immigrant students who graduate from US high schools, are of good moral character, arrived in the US as children, and have been in the country continuously for at least five years prior to the bill’s enactment, the opportunity to earn conditional permanent residency. The students would obtain temporary residency for a six year period. Within the six year period, a qualified student must have “acquired a degree from an institution of higher education in the United States or [have] completed at least 2 years, in good standing, in a program for a bachelor’s degree or higher degree in the United States,” or have “served in the uniformed services for at least 2 years and, if discharged, [have] received an honorable discharge.” Any alien whose permanent resident status is terminated [according to the terms of the Act] shall return to the immigration status the alien had immediately prior to receiving conditional permanent resident status under this Act.”

Wikipedia.

Passage of the Dream Act, however, won’t solve Herta Lluso’s deportation problem, because she’ll be gone, deported to Albania, long before it passes unless we get a stay of her deportation.

I found Herta’s story are at dreamactivist.org:

My name is Herta Llusho, I am 19 years old, and I writing this because I am about to be deported. I was born in Albania and was brought to the United States when I was 11 years old. With the help and support of my family, I have struggled through more than seven years of legal proceedings to find a way to stay in this country legally. Despite our best efforts, on August 19, I will be removed by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) from the only place I know as my home. I will be sent back to a country that has become a foreign place to me. I don’t even speak Albanian well anymore. My only hope of staying here is for as many people as possible to ask DHS to delay my deportation until the DREAM Act is passed.

My parents brought me to the United States because they believed in the promises this country had to offer. To them it was the land of opportunities, values, and ideals. They were faithful believers of the American Dream, meaning that through hard work, education, and good character their children could accomplish anything they wanted. In fact, they believed in it so strongly that they sacrificed their own lives, as well as their relationship to make it happen. My dad stayed in Albania with the hope of relocating to the US, while my mom left everything behind in pursuit of a better life for her children. To this day, even after many years of struggle and sacrifice, they still believe that it is all worth it, and so do I. I have been truly blessed in the many opportunities I have received. The United States has made me the person I am today. I would like nothing more than to contribute to the country that has given me so much.

You can read her entire story at Citizen Orange. And you can listen to her tell it here (audio is not great, so turn it up):

Let’s stop this deportation. Suggested action steps are here. Please do what you can.

Update:

ACTIONS

1. Join the facebook group for immediate updates: http://www.facebook.com/gr oup.php?gid=111108019510

2. Sign THIS petition which will be hand-delivered to targets: http://immigration.change.org/actions/view/stop_deportation_of_dream_student_herta_llusho

3. Use SEIU Click to Call Action Tool to call DHS: http://call.seiu.org/9/hertadhs

4. Call Senator Carl Levin at both his DC office – (202) 224-6221 – and his Detroit office – (313) 226-6020. Urge him to a) introduce private bill for Herta, and b) write letter to DHS asking them to stop Herta’s deportation.

5. Call Senator Stabenow at both her DC office – (202) 224-4822 – and her Lansing office – (517) 203-1760. Urge her to a) introduce private bill for Herta, and b) write letter to DHS asking them to stop Herta’s deportation.

6. Call Congresswoman Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick at both her DC office – (202) 225-2261 – and her Detroit office – (313) 965-9004. Urge her to a) introduce private bill for Herta, and b) write letter to DHS asking them to stop Herta’s deportation.

A Litblog Where Magical Realism Thrives

jueves, agosto 13, 2009

Stop Herta’s Deportation

19 year-old Herta Lluso is going to be deported from the US on August 19. Unless, of course, we can get ICE officials to grant her a stay of deportation.

Herta’s case is a strong example of just why we need the Dream Act:

The Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act (The “DREAM Act”) is a piece of proposed federal legislation that was introduced in the US Senate, and the US House of Representatives on March 26, 2009. This bill would provide certain illegal immigrant students who graduate from US high schools, are of good moral character, arrived in the US as children, and have been in the country continuously for at least five years prior to the bill’s enactment, the opportunity to earn conditional permanent residency. The students would obtain temporary residency for a six year period. Within the six year period, a qualified student must have “acquired a degree from an institution of higher education in the United States or [have] completed at least 2 years, in good standing, in a program for a bachelor’s degree or higher degree in the United States,” or have “served in the uniformed services for at least 2 years and, if discharged, [have] received an honorable discharge.” Any alien whose permanent resident status is terminated [according to the terms of the Act] shall return to the immigration status the alien had immediately prior to receiving conditional permanent resident status under this Act.”

Wiki.

Passage of the Dream Act, however, won’t solve Herta Lluso’s deportation problem, because she’ll be gone, deported to Albania, long before it passes unless we get a stay of her deportation.

I found Herta’s story are at dreamactivist.org:

My name is Herta Llusho, I am 19 years old, and I writing this because I am about to be deported. I was born in Albania and was brought to the United States when I was 11 years old. With the help and support of my family, I have struggled through more than seven years of legal proceedings to find a way to stay in this country legally. Despite our best efforts, on August 19, I will be removed by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) from the only place I know as my home. I will be sent back to a country that has become a foreign place to me. I don’t even speak Albanian well anymore. My only hope of staying here is for as many people as possible to ask DHS to delay my deportation until the DREAM Act is passed.

My parents brought me to the United States because they believed in the promises this country had to offer. To them it was the land of opportunities, values, and ideals. They were faithful believers of the American Dream, meaning that through hard work, education, and good character their children could accomplish anything they wanted. In fact, they believed in it so strongly that they sacrificed their own lives, as well as their relationship to make it happen. My dad stayed in Albania with the hope of relocating to the US, while my mom left everything behind in pursuit of a better life for her children. To this day, even after many years of struggle and sacrifice, they still believe that it is all worth it, and so do I. I have been truly blessed in the many opportunities I have received. The United States has made me the person I am today. I would like nothing more than to contribute to the country that has given me so much.

You can read her entire story at Citizen Orange. And you can listen to her tell it here (audio is not great, so turn it up):

There’s not a lot more to say about why Herta should be kept in this Country. It’s obvious. She is the kind of person we want in this Country. It is our loss to deport her.

Let’s stop this deportation. Suggested action steps are here. Please do what you can.

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