The outlook for China in 2013 is mild, but with a chance of showers

the outlook for China in 2013 is mild, but with a chance of showers
the outlook for China in 2013 is mild, but with a chance of showers

Big Red has been an economic powerhouse for decades, especially when it comes to cheap manufacturing and the seemingly endless supply of investment cash it has on hand. But there are some troubles ahead for China as the working class is growing tired of poor working conditions, low pay and a heavy-handed government.

It is hard to erase visions of Apple product assemblers jumping to their deaths at the Foxconn plant, as was widely reported this year.

Additionally, those who have money in China are asking for more freedom, always a sticking point in a country that controls nearly every facet of life. And let’s not forget that the real estate market has severely tanked, its bubble softly bursting under the guidance of a government hell bent on keeping the housing market from getting out of control.

All of this has cooled China’s growth over the past year. But analysts think that 2013 will be a rebound year, but not much of one. China’s growth rate in 2011 was a healthy 9.3%. That number drastically to 7.7% in 2012. It is expected that the communist country’s growth for 2013 will be around 8.3%. Talk about a roller coaster.

So is that a boom or a bust? Neither. Consider 2013 a middle-of-the-road year for the Asian powerhouse. While investors should be very cautious, there are still a few bright spots, namely the liberalization of some of the country’s economic sectors. But troubles around the world continue to be a drag on the Chinese economy as orders for goods have fallen, adding extra pressure on the country’s leaders to tweak the system further. And their moves haven’t always been seen as brilliant.

Pĥoto by eviltomthai

My choice of 5 best photos from flickr

Ray on a tree
Ray on a tree
Ray on a tree - Aixcracker (Finland)

The spectacular image of a beam falling on a tree challenges the best special effects and beyond … for real. Something that has earned for more than 530,000 visits.

The flight
The flight - LordV (UK)

The exciting flight of an insect Syritta pipiens has earned the nick reminiscentBritish metalheads to be in this selection.

Beams
Beams - Linus Gelber (USA)

The two beams of light replace New York’s twin towers, creating a beautiful skyline and cyberpunk, is the particular homage to the 11-S of the U.S.

In the delta
In the delta - Farla (Vietnam)

The rising tides of the Sea of ​​China and floods are creating a drama for millions of families in the Far East, but they serve to take pictures as nice as this.

Bucolic landscape
Bucolic landscape - Kenyai (Hungary)

This image is the perfect representation of a bucolic landscape. Taken during the Autumn in a Lombard village near the border with Switzerland, invited to make a perfect picnic.

Hostesses, euros and Chinese, in a millionaire fraud

Fraud to chinese

Fraud to chinese

This is one of the biggest scams since the birth of the euro. The Bundesbank (German Central Bank) has been defrauded of more than 6,000 million euros (almost U.S. $ 8,530 million) with 29 tons of coins thrown in Germany and reconstructed in China, reported yesterday the Prosecution of Frankfurt.

According to research, started a year ago, the crime is attributed to a gang-involved the Lufthansa airline stewardesses, which sent China coins of one and two euros withdrawn from circulation in Germany.

According to research, started a year ago, the crime is attributed to a band – of the participating airline Lufthansa flight attendants – who were sent to China coins of one and two euros withdrawn from circulation in Germany.

The scam began with the purchase of items of coins that the Bundesbank put on sale as scrap. Buyers then sent the coins thrown in shipments declared as scrap to China, where he returned to assemble.

On the coins scrap gold is separated from the center of the margin of them black, so with some skill can be restored. The coins were transported by Lufthansa employees have subsequently brought back mounted. From there they returned in remittances did not exceed $ 10,000, the maximum non-reportable.

According to research, started a year ago, the crime is attributed to a band – of the participating airline Lufthansa flight attendants – who were sent to China coins of one and two euros withdrawn from circulation in Germany.

The scam began with the purchase of items of coins that the Bundesbank put on sale as scrap. Buyers then sent the coins thrown in shipments declared as scrap to China, where he returned to assemble.

On the coins scrap gold is separated from the center of the margin of them black, so with some skill can be restored. The coins were transported by Lufthansa employees have subsequently brought back mounted. From there they returned in remittances did not exceed $ 10,000, the maximum non-reportable.

China: An Incredible Love Story

The 70-years old Chinese man who hand-carved over 6,000 stairs up a mountain for his 80-years old wife has passed away in the cave which has been the couple’s home for the last 50 years.

Over 50 years ago, Liu Guojiang a 19 years old boy, fell in love with a 29 years old widowed mother named Xu Chaoqin…

In a twist worthy of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, friends and relatives criticized the relationship because of the age difference and the fact that Xu already had children.

At that time, it was totally unacceptable and immoral for a young man to love an older woman. To avoid the market gossip and the scorn of their communities, the couple decided to elope and lived in a cave in Jiangjin County in Southern ChongQing Municipality.

Life was harsh in the beginning as they had nothing; no electricity or even food. They had to eat grass and roots they found in the mountain. Liu made kerosene lamp that they used to light up their lives.

Xu felt that she had tied Liu down and repeatedly asked him, ‘Are you regretful?’
Liu always replied, ‘As long as we are industrious, life will improve.
In the second year of living in the mountain, Liu begin and continued for over 50 years to hand-carve the steps so that his wife could get down the mountain easily.

Half a century laser in 2001, a group of adventures were exploring the forest and were surprised to find the elderly couple and the over 6,000 hand-carved steps.

One of their seven children said, ‘My parents loved each other so much, they have lived in seclusion for over 50 years and never been apart a single day. My dad carved these steps over the years for my mum’s convenience, although she doesn’t go down the mountain that much.

The couple had lived in peace for over 50 years until one fine day; Liu who is now 72 years old returned from his daily farm work and collapsed. Xu sat and prayed as he passed away in her arms. So in love with Xu, was Liu that no one was able to release the grip he had on his wife’s hand even after he had passed away.

‘You promised me you’ll take care of me, you’ll always be with me until the day I died, now you left before me, how am I going to live without you?’

Xu spent days softly repeating this sentence and touching her husband’s black coffin with tears rolling down her cheeks.

In 2006, their story became one of the top 10 love stories from China by the Chinese Woman Weekly. The local government has decided to preserve the love ladder and the place they lived as a museum so that the love story can live forever.