Inuit boy in seal skin

The best photography of December – Google +

I started on one edge of these rugged peaks and moved around to this side, to get the view from the glacial lake. The spiked mountains there are Cerro Torre, and I was very lucky to see them without cloud cover. I understand they are covered up 90% of the time, so to have crystal clear air was fortunate. The glacier there, which presents on the right but really goes back behind many more mountains, is called “Glacier Grande.” This was taken on a very cold morning as I was nearing the end of a 40km hike with a bunch of tough ex-Soviet military guys that ate borscht every meal

Trey Ratcliff
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I've Reached the Edge of the World

I've Reached the Edge of the World

Bryce has been photographed a Gazillion times. It’s an amazing place to behold. I wanted to come away with something of my own. An original that no-one else has. I arrived late in the day. Everyone was packing up with the disappearance of the days light. *Note to you people packing up, that’s the best light you knuckleheads, I kid I kid… I was alone on the rim which, is quite rare. The winds were-a-howlin’ and pushing me and the tripod towards the edge, what a rush! I’m in awe of the beauty. To behold such a place, at a time when the landscape is in decay, creating such unbelievable shapes and forms is truly ephiphanic, at least, to me!
Matt Anderson
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Kingdom Forlorn

Kingdom Forlorn

 

Grise Fjord in Inuktitut is Aujuittuq (ᐊᐅᔪᐃᑦᑐᖅ), meaning “place that never thaws”. What a fitting name for a hamlet that is often seen surrounded by ice even in the summer months on the northernmost island in Canada.
We were arriving from our expedition ship and were greeted by the locals after we navigated a maze of sea ice grounded on the shore by the tide. Among them was an RCMP officer who was originally born in the Grenadines in the Caribbean, we joked about the stark contrast of his previous life and now. Even though the people here are mainly inuit, they are also canadians, and for the most part they dress just like me. But for the sake of preserving history and traditions, for special occasions they will put on traditional clothing.

Kyle Marquardt
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Inuit boy in seal skin

Inuit boy in seal skin

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