The pacman package manager is one of the reasons why many of us fell in love with Arch Linux and its derivatives.

Simple and fast, both when installing official packages (in the community lately helpers type Yay or trizen triumph) and to update the system. Its pragmatism in the command line makes it one of the strong points of the distro.

Perhaps that is why it is surprising the decision of Manjaro, -of all the daughters of Arch Linux, the one that least resembles it, since it has its own repositories and stops between updates-, to do without the medium term and replace it completely by pamac.

An invention of the house, very similar name-perhaps too much-and that is distributed in graphic versions (GTK + 3 currently, and in the future possibly also Qt5) , as well as for the terminal where pamac-cli, would replace the venerable pacman, also doing help functions for AUR.

For many it is to reinvent the wheel, for other people it is to improve what exists.

That is the debate that has been brewing for a few days in the forums of Manjaro. According to Philip Müller, project leader:

It’s not to reinvent the wheel, it is the wheel.

Something that possibly we will not see before 2019, since pamac is intended to be totally solid and stable before taking that important step.

The idea is to provide all pacman functions, extracting some of the packages that compose it (such as libalpm).

Of course it should still be possible to install pacman from repositories and insurance to veteran users of Manjaro or those from Arch, it will cost them to rely on any other package manager.

Although it would not make much sense to have two programs that do exactly the same thing.

It is possible that some even choose to abandon the distro and resistance to change is to be expected, in addition to all kinds of criticism from the most purists.

It is a risk that the developers of Manjaro do not seem to fear too much.

Personally as a user of Arch Linux and Antergos, I have installed octopi (KDE) and pamac (GNOME).

I do not use them too much, but I find them useful to cheat about the existence or function of a given package (the same thing happens with Synaptic or previously with the YaST software manager).

Also essential for new Linux users, less familiar with the terminal.

Rolling makes the future

Let’s give time to the people of Manjaro that in general is characterized by its good work-we have seen it in issues such as hardware detection, artistic design or the management of system preferences-to see what product we are presented with.

It is possible that some manifest resistances to the change are to foresee, in addition to all kinds of criticism of the most purists. It is a risk that the developers of Manjaro do not seem to fear too much.

Personally as a user of Arch Linux and Manjaro, I have installed octopi (KDE) and pamac (GNOME).

I do not use them too much, but I find them useful to cheat about the existence or function of a given package (the same thing happens with Synaptic or previously with the YaST software manager).

Let’s give time to the people of Manjaro that in general is characterized by its good work-we have seen it in issues such as hardware detection, artistic design or the management of system preferences — to see what product we are presented with.

Maybe the disciple will surprise the teacher. In the worst case it will always be an interesting learning opportunity, because:

When the wheels come down
when the wheels touch ground
and you feel like it’s all over
there’s another round for you

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